Glasgow Incunabula Project update (18/12/13)


University of Glasgow Library

The Gnotosolitos by Arnoldus de Geilhoven (a massive work on morals and canon law) was the second work to be produced by the press of the Brothers of the Common Life (the Fratres Vitae Communis). This religious community ran the only printing house in Brussels in the 15th century.

Our copy of this work is rubricated throughout and features a nicely decorated sixteen line initial at the start of the main text. Rebound in the 18th century, the only evidence of use from early readers is the addition of early manuscript signatures and pagination. Like so many of our incunabula, it comes from the library of William Hunter, but we have no information on how or where he acquired it, or of its earlier ownership history. On the face of it then, in comparison with many of the books we have featured in these blogs, (although very large) this is…

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About bibliodeviant

This is the journal of Jonathan Kearns Rare Books & Curiosities, and all who sail in her. Information, updates, rantings, musings and pretty pictures related (loosely I would imagine) to the world of rare and antiquarian books will be brought to you by a number of different personalities, some of whom cohabit in the same person's head. We welcome queries, comments and contributions of virtually any description, and in return we will attempt to rein in our multitudinous personality disorders and deliver wonders and joys beyond compare. At least that's the plan. View all posts by bibliodeviant

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